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, the advancing america's networking and information technology research and development act of 2013. h.r. 967 is a good bipartisan bill which i was pleased to join mrs. lummis from wyoming and mr. hall from texas in introducing. h.r. 967 is largely based on a 2009 house-passed bill that was ntroduced by then-chairman gordon and ranking member hull. but this has some updates and reflects changing to the -- changes to the information and technology landscape as well as policy and management recommendations made by an outside panel of experts charged with evaluating nitr-d program. the program involves a collaboration of 15 federal resedge and development agencies, each contributing its own unique expertise and effort. to ensure that we make most effective use of our federal r&d resources and remain a leader in these fields. h.r. 967 requires that all 15 agencies come together to develop and periodically update a strategic plan for federal invest. s in -- investments in i.t. r&d. h.r. 967 will increase support, calls for increased support for large scale long-term interdisciplinary research in i
the impacts of extreme weather events, clean energy technologies and the threats of rising temperatures across the country. in contrast, we are not aware of any republican member who has spoken on the house floor about the dangers of climate change and the committee of jurisdiction is not even willing to hold a hearing to hear what the scientists and experts have to say about the issue. i have a message to house republicans, you can't make climate change go away by ignoring the problem. . . . the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentlewoman from washington rise? mrs. mcmorris rodgers: to address the house for one minute and to revise and extend my remarks. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. mrs. mcmorris rodgers: thank you, madam speaker. today, our hearts remain heavy -- our hearts are heavy for those who lost their lives on monday's unspeakable act of violence. for those who remain in critical condition, for the parents who lost their 8-year-old son, and for the families whose loved ones never came home from the boston marathon. while our sorrow is great, so, too, is o
is the next question. >> caller: the standards and technology. the agency tasked with buildis fail -- >> host three mike. do you have ollowup question? we undd whe you are going. >> caller: sample -- >> host: we'll see what the senator has to say about that. 9/11 conspiracy theories and different ways of looking at 9/11. what are your thoughts? >> guest: you know, the report that i go by is 9/11 commission frankly, many of the recommendations and assessments have become very relevant this week as we have dealt with a shocking tragedy in tbons. and, you know, actually given me this week an opportunity to reflect on how far we have come, for example, with homeland security in the ten years since that agency was created. as you noted, i'm on the home land security and government affairs committee, and, you know, they are hard at work. the joint terrorism task force through the fbi and homeland security and local officials in boston and trying to bring answers and bring ultimately the perpetrators to bear the full weight of justice in the united states. but, you know, back to the caller's questio
streets, near schools, the only technology that should be near a child in a school is a computer and not a gun. especially the ones that have these kinds of magazines that really only belong on the battlefields of our country and may have been purchased in gun shows without crime cal background checks. i think you have to be able to work in a bipartisan fashion to put together the coalition that can successfully pass that kind of legislation. >> go ahead. >> in terms of the political tactics right now not working in washington, is there something you would do right now to change what is essentially a stalling of these political tactics? >> why don't you start, mr. lynch. >> if i could follow up. i think most people know my background. a few years back, more than a few years back my cousin brian was gunned down in the old colony housing project, next door where we grew up. i know what it's like to have a family member killed by gun violence. i think that far too many families in this country know that feeling. nd i know that there's a lot of -- there are a lot of families out ther
, in eastern colorado we have seen new technologies that can produce american resources, that must and have to be a part of an all-of-the-above, an all-american energy plan. an all-american energy plan that will rely on not somebody thousands of miles away from us, not on somebody overseas, but right in our own backyard. our neighborhoods -- our neighbors. maybe our family members. people in our communities who can produce the energy that we use each and every moment of our lives, to better the lives of our families, to create the next product that will ignite an entire economy. but we can't do that unless we have an affordable energy policy. and that's why an all-american energy plan is so important. and that's why it's an absolute and fundamental key to making life work for so many people across this country. what we can do with natural gas, a clean-burning fuel created right -- developed, extracted right in colorado, what we can do to use the oil, the wind power, the solar power that we are utilizing in colorado to make life work for families. and how does life work? i think we're all fa
. it was the proper mix of people, technology, and infrastructure changes. that also was a big change. all of the money had gone into border patrol in the past year the new effort was to try to get a much more effective combination of researchers spirit that continues today. i predict that when the new bill comes out, there will be all kinds of focus on drones and more modern technology, etc.. that combination has been a very important change, as well. they all have to do with efforts made on the u.s. side, principles used that involved mexico in varying degrees. the fourth one of those principles had to do with the engagement with stakeholders, in communities as well as the mexican government. and cooperation and increased cooperation coronation with mexico. oft idea led to all kinds community-based mechanisms, advisory committees, stakeholders with the border patrol. it also had to do with systematic operation, law enforcement agency to law enforcement agency, between the as. border patrol, as well others on the ground, and mexico. there have been ups and downs over the years. efforts at
gets to the capitol rail mail room. >> just technology but also a combination of skills we teach people. there are fbi protocols to follow. >> the procedures work with washington, d.c.. they were discovered in the off site location. the screening doesn't work that. is where training can provide protection. >> there is a fine line between threatening and having a right to disagree. >> nothing chemical has been detected in mail sent to late leaders. >> state senator has been targeted several times. reese yeently by an engineer who police say sent death threats to the san francisco democrat. investigators found materials in this suspect's garage he is aware his next hate mail could contain ricin. >> providing security in this capitol. so it's on your mind and it's separated by assuming that the appropriate authorities are going to protect you and it's taken heart. >> yee says in sacramento, abc 7 news. >> a san francisco land snark a new location on the water front. new exploratorium opened after moving from long time location at the palace of fine arts. this museum has been offering fun t
, but if you think about the success in reducing alcohol-impaired driving through technology, through sanctions, through education, through engineering, we can do the same thing about drugged driving. but the most important thing was atten the public, and i think that's what we've done. thank you, bob. >> we are almost out of time. but before asking the last question, we have a couple of housekeeping matters to take care of. first of all, i'd like to remind you about our upcoming luncheon events. on april 19th patrick donahoe, postmaster general, usps, will discuss challenges meeting the evolving demands of the nation's postal system. on may 7th, chris evert, tennis legend and publisher "tennis" magazine. and on june 3rd we will host the annual presentation of the gerald r. ford journalism awards. second, i would, with great feeling -- [laughter] in view of how you've covered your topic and you've generated so many questions, wow, i mean, i think -- i don't know if we keep track of a record and for handling them so well. i'd like to present you with the traditional npc mug. [applause] the scri
to science, technology, engineering and math? and i'm happy to have so many key members of my science team who are here today including my chief science adviser, john holder, who's here. there's john. nih director francis collins. there's francis right there, the tall guy. we've got acting director of the national science foundation, cora merit, there's cora, and we've got real life astronaut and nasa administrator charles bolton. where's charlie? there he is right there. we need to make in this a priority, train an army of new teachers in these subject areas and to make sure that all of us as a country are lifting up these subjects for the respect that that they deserve. you know, and one of the things i'm concerned about is that as a culture, you know, we're great consumers of technology, but we're not always properly respecting the people who are in the labs and, you know, behind the scenes creating the stuff that we now take for granted. and we've got to give the millions of americans who work in science and technology not only the kind of respect they deserve, but also new ways to eng
time, you could argue that it means a decrease in personnel. because you're using technology, using cameras to replace, you know, eyeballs. but i don't think we've come to that determination. we're down -- the police department is down 6,000 police officers than where we were 11 years ago. so we've already sort of paid the price. and we're using to a certain extent technology to plug the gaps. we're increasing the number of cameras that we have. one of the things that we're doing, we had it in motion prior to the boston marathon. but we want to increase the number of mobile cameras that we have so we can put them up at events and then move them to other events. along our marathon route, we have 220 cameras. but most of them are on bridges. we want to increase at least the public sector cameras that we have along that route. >> all right. new york city police commissioner, ray kelly, thank you very much. it's always good to see you. >> thank you for the great job you keep doing for the city. >> thank you. >>> a new book on afghanistan that's not so good. president hamid karzai had to
have the lead on this investigation. now in terms of having all of the technology and the manpower and woman power necessary to put all the information together that's something the f.b.i. can do well. unfortunately in the past in these investigations federal law enforcement use it as a one way street. they'll take information from the locals and they won't share anything. from watching the press conference i think they're will be the kind of sharing back and forth that needs to occur in order to advance the investigation. >> what do you make of the reports from seen year law enforcement that there was no chatter about this leading up to the event? >> because this was a domestic event if there was any chatter that was international it doesn't necessarily mean that it they were prepared to share it with the local law enforcement. i think that will be one of the other interesting stories to follow in the coming days. because in the past the f.b.i. has been very effective at detecting internationally and domestically activities before they occurred. this one clearly got through all th
to this place. the death of a police officer at massachusetts institute of technology reported at 12:45 a.m. today. after that, cnn's drew griffin reported that explosives may have been involved in the situation. and then we were off to the races. police advising watertown residents to stay inside. the fbi saying it is trying to determine right around 2:31 in the morning if that situation in watertown, of course, was connected to the boston marathon bombing and we all know what happened after that. now, we're going to go back to anderson, and anderson, i can take you all the way through the chronology, but bring us up to date with what you have. >> joe, it is interesting, just going through the chronology with you, again, this did begin with that report of a robbery at a convenience store in cambridge. cnn was on the air reporting it live with the killing of the police officer, 26-year-old police officer, young man, whose colleagues have come out with effusive praise for him over the last several hours obviously. officer wounded in that -- early morning hours in watertown, and that was re
cameras. ♪ and even stop itself if it has to. the technology may be hard to imagine. but why you would want it... is not. the 2014 e-class. it doesn't just see the future. it is the future. >>> new this morning, runners at the london marathon are remembering victims of the boston bombings. good morning, welcome to mornings on 2. i'm claudine wong. >> and i'm eric rasmussen. runners held a moment of silence this morning for the victims of the boston bombings. many runners wore black ribbons as a tribute throughout the 26- mile race. race organizers are donating $100,000 to one fund boston. that's the relief effort set up by the state of massachusetts. >> very proud the other runners from the united states running here and i think it will be an emotional time for me as well. >> about 40% more police officers than normal patrolled the event. >>> cheered on all the participants. he had no hesitations about coming to the race and called the response to the boston bombings remarkable. >> and happening right now, a church service in boston for the victims of the twin bombings. this is a l
records are prime targets for attackers to steal. according to the information technology industry council, 18 adults become victims to cybercrime, including identity campaigns ishing every second. this adds up to 1 1/2 million cybercrime victims each day. cyberattacks present a very real and dangerous threat to the united states, however the government currently
in a competitive market, we win. we have the best workers. we have the best technology. we have freedom. we have the rule of law. we need to do commonsense tax reform for the purposes of putting us in a position where we can create the jobs today and for generations to come because we will then create a fair, level playing field that allows us to start building things in america, allows us to put people to work for generations to come. so i appreciate my good friend from oklahoma bringing this issue to the forefront and having this conversation tonight. and i know he's bringing forth a copy of the code and the regulations and all you have to do is look at that colossal piece of paper or reams of paper, books of paper, 70,000 pages of statutory tax and regulation. we in america can do better. we as house republicans demand us to do better, and we will do better under the leadership that house republicans are doing in the ways and means committee and as a conference to make sure that we end up with a code that is simple, fair and no longer is riddled with loopholes, big government handouts, big go
Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15

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